Parks, Trails and Green Spaces

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Questions, comments and other park-related can be addressed to Guy Goldsmith, North Liberty’s director of parks, buildings, grounds at ggoldsmith@northlibertyiowa.org or (319) 626-5720.

Individuals may reserve shelters and recreation equipment for personal use. Shelter information can be obtained by calling the Recreation Center at 626-5716 during normal business hours. Park shelters in Penn Meadows, Quail Ridge, Old Towne, Beaver Kreek, Fox Run, Freedom, Koser, Deerfield and Liberty Centre parks are available for reservation at $5 for a four-hour block. Download the park shelter reservation form.

To the right is a downloadable map of North Liberty’s parks and trails, and below is a listing of park amenities. An amenity noted with a ● is available year around, a ☼ is available in the summer only and a ♦ is a planned future amenity. More details about North Liberty’s parks and trails are available below. Future park planning is guided by the Park Plan, updated and adopted by the City Council on Feb. 2, 2016.

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Beaver Kreek Park

CIMG1206Beaver Kreek Park was open to the public in 1972. Beaver Kreek Park’s name was created by using the developer’s initials, George Buechler and Ralston Kornegor. The land for the park was dedicated to the City of North Liberty as part of the platting of the Beaver Kreek subdivisions developed by Buechler and Kornegor. Playground equipment was added in 1972 with the help of a 50% grant from the Iowa DNR Land and Water Conservation (LAWCON) fund.

Beaver Kreek Park is located at the end of South Chestnut Street. This 2.9-acre park is an attractive neighborhood park with three pedestrian accesses from Juniper Court, Birch Court and South Hickory Street. This park features a pedestrian bridge and beautiful trees throughout the park. Facilities include a wide variety of playground equipment; a larger basketball court; picnic tables and benches.

Broadmoor Pond

CIMG1196Broadmoor Park & Pond is located east of South Front Street on Broadmoor Drive.

The land for this 9.37- acre park was donated to the City by the Broadmoor Estates Subdivision Developer Mike Roberts. The land was accepted by the City on October 14, 2008 although the City has maintained it since 2002.

On October 14, 2003 the Parks Department collaborated with the Iowa Department of Natural Resources (DNR) to obtain 3,000 bluegills and channel catfish to stock the pond. During the summer of 2004 the pond received approximately 340 largemouth Bass.

In 2006 the Boy Scouts along with Parks Staff completed an Eagle Scout project and planted trees around the park and pond.

Centennial Park

Centennial-Park Centennial Park, opened in 2013 on St. Andrews Drive west of Jones Boulevard, is the community’s largest park. It is still being development, but currently includes a stocked pond on its 40 acres of greenspace. The next phases are expected to include on-site parking, picnic shelters, an enclosed pavilion, a band shell, various play features and a splash pad.

The park was named after council, staff and parks and recreation commissioners chose from more than 300 public suggestions.

Cornerstone Park Nature Area

CIMG1210Cornerstone Park is a 2.44- acre parcel that sits undeveloped surrounded by residential on three sides and commercial on the fourth. Cornerstone Nature Area is located at the intersection of Dubuque Street and Zeller Street and Whitman Avenue dead ends into the property on the North. It was donated to the City October 4, 2008 by Richard Ferguson who wanted the area to stay undeveloped and maintained as a park setting.

In October 2008 the City was awarded a $100,000 DNR REAP (Resource, Enhancement and Protection) grant to develop the property. The development plan includes restoration of the prairie and woodland areas, installation of trails, a pedestrian bridge, burying of power lines and pole removal and lighting. The total estimate cost of the project is $201,254. Work will begin in July 2008.

Creekside Commons Park

CIMG1193Creekside Commons Park is located west of South Front Street across from the new elementary school off Vandello Drive and Sadler Drive. The land for this 17-acre park was donated by property owners Steve and Kathryn Epley in December 2004. The developer has constructing an 8-foot concrete trail on both sides of Muddy Creek. The trail will help tie in the development with the new elementary and junior high school. The southwest corner of the park is large enough for a soccer field or ball diamond.

On October 5, 2006 the Parks Department collaborated with the Iowa Department of Natural Resources (DNR) to obtain 500 bluegills and channel catfish to stock the pond that is located on the east side of Sadler Lane. During the summer of 2007 the pond received approximately 100 largemouth Bass.

In 2006 North Liberty received a $50,000 playground grant that was used to purchase a new playground structure for this park. The playground structure was installed in July 2008.

The remainder of the property includes a significant amount of woodland and wetland areas. The City will be posting designated wetland signs around the area restricting mowing or spraying of any kind to allow the proper wetland seedlings to grow.

Deerfield Park

CIMG1222Deerfield Park is North Liberty’s eighth park and opened March 2005 to the public. This 4-acre neighborhood park is located on the north side of North Liberty in the Deerfield subdivision off Fawn Drive. In 2006 North Liberty received a $40,000 playground grant that was used to purchase a new playground structure for this park. The playground structure was installed in the summer of 2007.

Goose Lake

CIMG1225Goose Lake is located between West Penn street and 240th street just east of the I-380 interchange. It is a 31.34-acre park/pond donated to the City by the Cedar Development Progress Park LLC Developer Scott Anderson.

On October 5, 2006 the Parks Department collaborated with the Iowa Department of Natural Resources (DNR) to obtain 2000 bluegills and channel catfish to stock the pond. During the summer of 2007 the pond received approximately 300 largemouth Bass.

Goose Lake is part of a designated wetland area. The city will be posting designated wetland signs around the pond restricting mowing or spraying of any kind to allow the proper wetland seedlings to grow.

Freedom Park

CIMG1233The land for this 7.07-acre park, located along Jones Boulevard, was donated by Southgate Subdivision developer, Glenn Siders in October 2000. This park features a large pond and native trees and prairie. The native trees and prairie were planted in 2001 through funds received from Siders and the Million More By 2004 Grant.

This park was named through a contest with North Liberty residents submitting suggestions to the Parks and Recreation Commission. The Commission decided on Freedom Park, a suggestion given by residents to honor the victims of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks.

Fox Run Neighborhood Park

CIMG1211North Liberty opened its fifth park in the summer of 2000 when a basketball court was placed in the 1.73-acre park, followed by a playground in 2001. The property, located in the Fox Run Subdivision along Scales Bend Road, was donated by subdivision owner Clair Mekota and residents of the Fox Run Subdivision gathered together to raise funds for the playground equipment and the basketball court. The playground consists of spring rider toys, sand diggers, swing set, chin pull-up bars, tether ball, and a funnel ball.

Fox Run Park & Pond

CIMG1216The land for this 6.6- acre park, located on the north side off of Scales Bend Road was donated by the Fox Run Subdivision Developer Clair Mekota to the city in the spring of 2002.

On October 14, 2003 the Parks Department collaborated with the Iowa Department of Natural Resources (DNR) to obtain 3,000 bluegills and channel catfish to stock the pond. During the summer of 2004 the pond received approximately 340 largemouth Bass.

Joy’s Park

CIMG1326Joy’s Park is a 2.50- acre park located west of South Front Street and tucked away at the dead end of Golf View Drive. The land was donated by property owners J.R. and Joy Brumley on December 12, 2006 and the park was named after Joy Brumley. The area is a naturally wooded area and is not accessible to the public by vehicle. At this time it will remain a low maintenance nature area.

Koser Park

CIMG1256Koser Park became a city park after it was voted to accept the ball field from the Softball Association on July 1, 1968. Koser Park was originally called “City Park” because it was the only park at that time. After Beaver Kreek and Penn Meadows parks were added, the park was usually referred to as “Koser Park” because of its location next to Koser’s General Store and Mort Koser’s involvement in sports in North Liberty. In 1987, after Mort Koser’s death, the park was officially named Koser Park. This 3-acre park is located west of Dubuque Street and Penn Elementary School. Facilities include one youth and adult softball and baseball field and an outdoor basketball court.

Liberty Centre Park

CIMG1305This $3,042,339 million dollar project was a cooperative effort between the City of North Liberty and several local developers completed in 2006. Liberty Centre, located on the southwest quadrant of the Penn Street and Highway 965 intersection, includes commercial and residential development based around the idea of a cohesive city center. North Liberty enhanced its commercial identity with an exciting park project.

New businesses looking to locate in Liberty Centre include a hotel, restaurants and shops. The North Liberty City Council has been working with area builders and business owners to ensure that this project is a magnet for attractive development. Commercial lots are unified by a comprehensive landscaping plan centered around a large, boulder-lined pond. The Liberty Centre Pond includes scenic features like a waterfall, fountains, pedestrian bridge, fishing pier, pavilion with a small gazebo and extra-wide sidewalks all around the pond. Modeled after the Jordan Creek Mall pond in West Des Moines, this area is a community focal point, just across the road from our magnificent Community Center.

An important element of this project design is the pedestrian underpass on Highway 965. This passageway links the Liberty Centre Pond to the east side Highway 965, just steps away from the Community Center, and provides a safe pedestrian connection between the east and west to help unite North Liberty’s expanding community.

The City received Community Attraction and Tourism (CAT) funding from the state’s Vision Iowa program to assist with construction of this underpass and trail connections to the project. Liberty Centre, LLC contributed $75,000 toward trails and fountains and have constructed the pond.

Libery Centre Pond has been stocked with largemouth bass, bluegills and channel catfish and is now ready for fishing.

North Liberty Recreational Trail

IMG_0603North Liberty opened the Recreational Trail in 1998, and in 1999 the trail was connected to Coralville’s Recreational Trail. This 3.3-mile walking and biking trail begins at the Fox Run subdivision and goes south to Forevergreen Road where it connects to the Coralville trail. The Bike Shelter is located on the trail northeast of the Community Center, and has restrooms, a drinking fountain and picnic tables.

Native prairie grass is being established along sections of the Recreational Trail. North Liberty expanded the trails system by 3.5 miles in 2006, which includes Liberty Centre Pond, Creekside Commons, North Trail Extension to Fox Run subdivision, and the North Trail addition from Liberty Centre to the Deerfield subdivision.

Old Town Park

CIMG1260This 0.55-acre park offers a comfortable, small town setting featuring a gazebo and clock. The park is located south of Penn Meadows Park and along Dubuque Street. The ribbon cutting ceremony was held on June 5, 2001. The North Liberty City Band holds concerts in the gazebo, and benches provide a great place to relax and enjoy North Liberty.

Parkview Neighborhood Park

CIMG1246This park is located on a small lot off Parkview Ct. A swing set and picnic table enhance the area.

Penn Meadows Park

CIMG1272North Liberty’s third and largest park, Penn Meadows Park, received its name from suggestions solicited from North Liberty residents in 1985, and Penn Meadows was selected by the Parks and Recreation Commission. The first 18.7 acres were purchased from Richard and Jeanette Meade in 1983. Additional land and recreation facilities were added with LAWCON grants in 1983, 1984 and 1985.

This park is located south of Penn Street and north of Penn Elementary School. This 37-acre park provides excellent recreational opportunities for the entire family. Facilities include picnic shelters for private and group use; Nine youth and adult softball and baseball fields; two soccer fields; playground equipment; volleyball court; new tennis courts; and a pedestrian trail throughout the park.

Quail Ridge Park

CIMG1241Quail Ridge Park was purchased in 1991. The Parks and Recreation Commission decided to name the park Quail Ridge Park after reviewing suggestions from North Liberty residents.

This 10-acre park is located at the west end of Zeller Street. Facilities include a shelter; picnic tables; playground equipment; a baseball and softball batting backstop and basketball court.

West Lakes

CIMG1230West Lakes is a 48.31- acre park/pond located off of 270th street adjacent to the new Clear Creek/Amana North Bend elementary school. The land was donated to the City by the JDHP Development Developer Jason Harder.

On October 5, 2006 the Parks Department collaborated with the Iowa Department of Natural Resources (DNR) to obtain 4,000 bluegills and channel catfish to stock the pond. During the summer of 2007 the pond received approximately 550 largemouth Bass.

West Lakes is also part of a designated wetland area. The city will be posting designated wetland signs around the pond restricting mowing or spraying of any kind to allow the proper wetland seedlings to grow.

Park Rules:

All parks close at 10 p.m., and there are no motorized vehicles allowed on park property. Prohibited actions in parks and playgrounds: No person shall, in any park and playground within the city:
A. Pick or destroy any flower or walk or run upon any flower beds;
B. Break or tear any limbs or branches from any shrub or tree;
C. Throw objects or missiles at any animal or bird, in or out of cages, or molest any animal or bird in any way;
D. Tear down, mutilate, destroy or carry away any sign erected under the authority of the city council;
E. Damage turf by any means;
F. Park any vehicle in any area where parking is prohibited;
G. Drive any vehicle, including snowmobiles and bicycles, within parks or playgrounds except upon the designated streets, driveways and parking areas of such parks and playgrounds;
H. Carry firearms or weapons into any park or playground in the city, except public officials in the performance of their duties and those persons authorized to carry weapons for public ceremonies;
I. Bring, cause or permit any dog to enter into any park or playground unless such dog is on a leash, and said person must clean up after their dog;
J. Ride any horse in any park or playground except upon designated streets and bridle paths;
K. Practice golf in any park
L. Build or aid and abet the building of any fire in any park or playground except in stoves or fireplaces designed for such purposes unless granted special authorization by the city;
M. Occupy any shelter house or building or recreation area which has been reserved through the provisions of this chapter for other person, or to erect any reserve sign at any shelter house or building when no reservation has been obtained from the director or recreation department as provided in this chapter;
N. Dispose of refuse in anything other than refuse containers;
O. Shall climb or scale any erected structures, fences and/or poles unless that structure is so designed;
P. Be in any park, whether on foot or in a vehicle, or permit any vehicle to remain parked in any park between 10 p.m. and sunrise unless by special authorization;
Q. Engage in vandalism. Parking Regulations: Only city employees are authorized to designate driveways and parking areas in which parking is prohibited and permitted.
R. Swimming, boating and use of flotation devices are not permitted in North Liberty ponds.
S. Alcohol of any kind is not allowed in city parks.

 

Ice fishing on North Liberty’s ponds has been approved by the City Council. The Iowa Department of Natural Resources’ rules, regulations and policies regarding ice fishing. You can download the DNR’s fishing regulations and introduction to ice fishing for further guidance.